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War on drugs, political, drug czar, marijuana, cocaine, PCP, CIA, drug dealers, AIDS, medical marijuana, drugsWar on drugs is a self-serving political policyWar on drugs, political, drug czar, marijuana, cocaine, PCP, CIA, drug dealers, AIDS, medical marijuana, drugs

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Decades into the policy called "War on Drugs," no real headway has been made.

The only progress that has been made is in the careers of politicians and bureaucrats who claim they want to end substance abuse. As a compassionate people we must ask if, within this war on drugs, we are doing what is most effective and most compassionate.

In "Inside congress" by Ronald Kessler, Robert Gellman, counsel and staff director of a House subcommittee declared about their setting up the drug czar, "we set it up so it wouldn't work." Thus they provided a scapegoat for failure. Kessler also documented charges by Joseph Califano of the House Ethics Committee that the Capitol police failed to follow leads of sales of marijuana, cocaine and PCP by congressional employees and capitol police.

Ignoring drug trafficking appears to be common. On Nov 4 the San Francisco Chronicle detailed a report declaring the CIA did little to nothing about Contra drug smuggling. On Nov 3, the Washington Post also ran a story stating that the CIA requested the holding back of drug charges involving alleged Contra drug dealers.

Dr Donald Abrams, a leader in AIDS research, exposed the absurdity of the war on drugs. After putting up with bureaucratic delays for his study of the effects cannabis might have on AIDS wasting syndrome, NIDA Director Alan Leshner refused to give him access to legal cannabis for the research (MAPS newsletter, Volume 5, No.4). These same people who have delayed and/or denied research now say, "We need more studies." As expected, this is also an area of inaccuracy and government interference.

Throughout the nation the debate over medicinal cannabis continues. In some cases, in strong contrast to the will of the people our government is suppose to serve. In Washington, D.C., the federal government has ruled that the votes of Ballot measure No.59 (medical marijuana) will not be counted. No matter how one feels about medical marijuana, does congress have the right to intentionally subvert the electoral process?

Investigating factual documents and studies and understanding and treating those addicted are the first steps to controlling and lessening the drug problem. Our elected representatives must also begin to do what is right for citizens and not merely "feel good" actions to assist in reelection.


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War on drugs, political, drug czar, marijuana, cocaine, PCP, CIA, drug dealers, AIDS, medical marijuana, drugs